Tag Archives: Headliner

Orangewood Park Soccer Complex – Opening Day

Thousands of young soccer players and their families attended the opening of West Covina’s new soccer park. Two lighted soccer fields, that can be divided to accommodate a dozen 7 kid teams. A challenging new play space that delivers the six key elements of play and picnic areas for groups large and small. The broad park program includes walking pathways with play and discovery “pockets” and gardens. This park provides a great venue for play and recreation. Sustainability features include low water-use plantings for off-the-field areas that will save millions of gallons of water a year and the parking lot is accented with permeable pavement that captures first flush runoff. This is a pretty park with plenty of areas to explore. A new restroom and concession facility makes this a stay-all-day beautiful and fun community park.

1615 W. Merced Avenue
West Covina, CA 91790

Parks Make Life Better

Last month was “Parks Make Life Better” month but here at DVD we like to apply this motto into all the parks that we design and build all the time.

There are a number of ways our cities parks have made lives better and communities richer. Enhanced exercise equipment, fitness areas and running trails in parks encourage physical activity and health in our citizens. New and improved playground areas give kids a reason to get out of house and be more active. Quality picnic areas and shelters are easy hosts for many parties and gatherings. Art installations and displays spolights cultural significance and talent of a city. These are only a few ways parks make life better and enrich a whole community. How has your city’s parks made your life better?

The Case for Native Plants in the Landscape

Landscapes that incorporate native plantings promote a thriving local ecology.

Planting landscapes with native plants not only enhances and beatifies our parks but acts as an educational tool for visitors. These plants have been uniquely designed (a century long of evolving) for our gardens and encourage local habitat, such as friendly birds, fluttering butterflies, and beneficial insects. Pollinators attracted to them in the surrounding area can help produce a more abundant fruit tree and vegetable harvest. These landscapes link us to our wild native landscapes and help bridge the gap that development has created over time. The way in which we have maintained many of our public landscapes has had detrimental effects on local and distant environments. Contaminated runoff into our streams and oceans from pesticide and fertilizer use and overuse of finite resources such as water have major implications on our present lives and the ones of future generations.

Native Landscapes

When using the greatest adapted native plant community for an area (coastal sage scrub and bluff, chaparral, southern oak woodland, etc.), the maintenance, including watering, pruning and fertilizing is drastically reduced. In addition, designs which use plants with differing bloom cycles create a colorful and unique aesthetic look year-round. There is no guessing game about how to treat these plants. Give them what they have been designed to thrive on; native soil without additional fertilizers, minimal supplemental water after establishment, plenty of elbow room to grow, and once a year pruning. Even many varieties of native plants have been developed to be more tolerant of ‘garden settings’, where they may get maintained improperly. Enhancing the beauty of our public spaces, reducing detrimental environmental effects and saving money means native plants should be grown in every public and private space!